With the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 came many changes and opportunities to how Medicaid Administrative Claiming (MAC)/Medi-Cal Administrative Activities (MAA) or Targeted Case Management (TCM) programs are funded. Ramsell Public Health & Safety aims to be a resource that connects our agency partners, elected representatives and like-minded organizations to information that sheds light on this evolving topic.

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Justice Involved

Medicaid Expansion and Justice Involved (NHCHC)

Homeless health care providers and administrators within the criminal justice system share significant numbers of common patients, and also share important goals. These include wanting to see improved health status among patients, increased community safety, reduced recidivism and health care costs, and an increased capacity within the community to deliver needed health care services.

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Justice Involved FAQ (COCHS)

Under the ACA (and prior to the ACA), no health care services provided to detainees or inmates in jails or prisons are paid for by Medicaid. Those services are paid for the same way they were prior to the enactment of the ACA.

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Criminal Justice: Intersections and Implications (BJA)

Various provisions of the Affordable Care Act—including the expansion of Medicaid, investments to be made in health information technology, establishment of health insurance exchanges, and minimum essential coverage—have direct and indirect implications for criminal justice.

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How Medicaid Expansion Can Lower Prison Costs, Recidivism (Governing)

Expansion states are taking advantage of the chance to cover outside hospitalizations that cost their states millions, as well as the opportunity to enroll parolees in Medicaid. Studies show health care keeps them from returning to prison.

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Reentry Strategies

Reentry Matters: Strategies and Success of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States (Justice Center)

With over 95 percent of people in the nation’s state prisons expected to be released at some point,1 officials at all levels of government recognize the need for initiatives to support the successful reentry of these individuals to their communities.

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Reducing Recidivism: States Deliver Results (Justice Center)

For years, elected state officials responded to the public’s frustration with high crime rates by making incarceration the centerpiece of their crime policy. Suggesting that “nothing works” to rehabilitate individuals incarcerated in prisons and jails, policymakers across the political spectrum saw high rates of re-offense as inevitable.

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